Protection Equipment

An Overview of Steel Grating

Steel-Grating-Hot-Galvanized-
The steel grating manufacturers are uniquely positioned to provide grating products and services to you and your organization that are unmatched within the grating industry. Our inventory includes: bar grating, steel grating, railroad grating, fiberglass grating, wire cloth, heavy duty bar grating, aluminum bar grating, swaged or welded stainless steel bar grating.

When choose steel grating products, you should according to the application and characteristics of grating. Welded bar grating is the most popular of all grating types due to its strength, cost-efficient production and ease of installation. Aluminum grating is ideally suited for use in corrosive environments. Expanded metal grating is the most practical and economical way to assure strength, safety, and a non-skid surface.

Compound steel grid grating is composed by steel grid grating of certain load-bearing and checkered plates with thickness of 3mm, 4mm, 5mm or 6mm. Heavy type steel bar with big gauge is normally chosen in making compound steel grid gratings. As the steel grating manufacturers, our security walkway platform grating with bearing bar 50 steel all ranges of steel gratings and steel bar grating clips.

 


Gun Cabinet: Your Guns Need A Home Too

image from www.safehomeconsulting.com

gun cabinet is a secure and protective storage container for one or more firearms, and, or ammunition for those guns. Gun safes are primarily used to prevent access to unauthorized or unqualified persons, for burglary protection, and, in more capable safes, to protect the contents from damage during a flood, fire, or natural disaster. Access prevention is required by law in many places, necessitating a gun lock, metal gun cabinet, or gun safe. Gun safes have largely replaced the gun cabinets made of fine stained wood with etched glass fronts used for display that were commonly used decades ago, although some gun safes are made to resemble such gun cabinets.

Gun safes may include additional security features such as fire or water protection, combination lock, digital lock, and fingerprint identification.

Electronic locks as well as mechanical locks are available on many models of safes. The highest reliability exists for mechanical locks, although they are often more time consuming to open than electronic locks. Some mechanical combination locks have key locks, too, that lock the combination lock dial from turning, thereby precluding casual attempts by anyone with physical access to the safe from trying multiple combinations in the hopes of unlocking the safe.

Some safes use live locking bolt technology and pry resistant metal to ensure the secure protection of its contents. Some safes provide only protection against burglary and unwanted access from young family members, while other safes provide additional protection against fire and flood and other natural disasters.

 


Making Your Home Safe For Baby

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Your baby is on the way, and there is a lot to think about. Besides making sure that you have baby furniture and clothing for your new son or daughter, you'll want to check that your home is safe. These tips can help you cover all the safety bases.

Before you bring baby home:

  • Remove pillows, blankets, and stuffed animals from the crib to prevent your baby from suffocation.
  • Check to see that smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors in your home are working. Place at least one smoke detector on each level of your home and in halls outside of bedrooms. Have an escape plan in case of fire.
  • Put emergency numbers, including poison control, near each phone. Have at least one phone in your home connected by land line. Cordless phones do not work when the power is out, and cellphone batteries can run out.
  • Make sure your home or apartment number is easy to see so fire or rescue can locate you quickly in an emergency.
  • Make sure handrails are installed and secure in stairways. Always hold the handrail when using stairs, especially when holding your baby.

Your baby will be crawling before you know it. Most babies begin crawling around six to nine months. Crawling on your hands and knees will reveal many dangers to your baby. Thinking ahead to the toddler years will help you to take care of other hazards before your baby grows and finds them first. Here are some things to do before your baby is crawling:

  • Cover all unused electrical sockets with outlet plugs.
  • Keep chords out of baby's reach. Tack up chords to vertical blinds and move furniture, lamps, or electronics to hide chords.
  • Secure furniture and electronics, such as bookcases and TVs, so they cannot be pulled down on top of your baby.
  • Use protective padding to cover sharp edges and corners, such as from a coffee table or fireplace hearth.
  • Install safety gates at the bottom and top of stairwells or to block entry to unsafe rooms.
  • Use safety latches on cabinets and doors.
  • Store all medicines, cleaning products, and other poisons out of baby's reach.
  • Remove rubber tips from doorstops or replace with one-piece doorstops.
  • Look for and remove all small objects. Objects that easily can pass through the center of a toilet paper roll might cause choking.
  • Keep houseplants out of baby's reach. Some plants can poison or make your baby sick.
  • Set you water heater temperature to no higher than 125 degrees Fahrenheit. Water that is hotter can cause bad burns.
  • Closely supervise your baby around a family pet. Pets need time to adjust to a new baby.

How To Install A Wall Safe

image from www.everydaynodaysoff.com

Locate the wall studs with a stud sensor or hammer and nail. Then, use a level to draw a 14¼-inch square onto the wall between the two studs. Cut out the opening with a drywall saw; work carefully to make sure you don't cut into electrical wiring. (If you find some, you'll have to push it aside or reroute it.)

The left and right edges of the cutout will extend ¼-inch beyond the studs on each side of the opening. Fill in these spaces with wood shims or strips of ¼-inch plywood to build the studs out flush with the edges of the opening. Secure the wood with finishing nails.

With its door open, tilt the safe into the opening and press it flush against the wall.

Fasten the safe to the studs with the four screws provided. Install the two removable steel shelves, if desired. Note that you’ll need both the three-digit combination and the key to open the safe.

 

Source: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/how-to/intro/0,,20177939,00.html

 


Fingerprint Safes

image from images2.opticsplanet.com

Once reserved for military and government, fingerprint safes are the latest trend in home and office safes. There are numerous advantages of owning a fingerprint safe, compared with a traditional safe. First, these safes operate with the touch of a finger. No more lost keys or forgotten passwords. Second, as your fingerprint is unique, these safes are extremely secure, as no one else has your fingerprint. The safes are extremely easy to program, add or delete users and, with a fingerprint capacity of 100, are the perfect keyless solution to protect valuables.

The safe recognizes only the fingerprints you select and does not recognize any others. Thieves simply can’t break in, and little prying fingers will soon give up in frustration. You’ll never again have to fumble for keys, lose them or worry about where to hide them. No complicated combinations to remember either. 


Crack Almost Any Electronic Safe with the Bounce Technique

 

If you have a electronic safe with a passcode entry, a few things could go wrong. You could forget the code, the electronic mechanism could fail, or someone could change the code without you knowing. In the event you need to break into your own electronic safe, here's how to do it.

The technique you use to crack an electronic safe is called safe bouncing (which is an accurate name once you see how it's done). It's apparently easy enough for a kid to do, but looks like it could take a bit of practice. As you can see in the video above, you literally drop part of the safe against the table (or whatever surface it's resting upon) while turning the locking knob. If your timing is right, you'll have turned the knob when the safe's lock bounces open for a brief moment. This works because many cheaper safes have locks that lift. Better safes have counterweight mechanisms so the lock is held in place even when the safe is moving. You won't be able to bounce those open, but you'll have no problem with the lower-end options. If you're successful, the deadbolts will recede into the safe's door and you'll be able to open it up.

While good for those times when you lose your passcode, it's not so great for those times when someone tries to rob you. If you're concerned about the safety of a given safe, you might want to try this bouncing technique before your purchase.


How to Buy a Fireproof Safe

image from www.safeman.org.uk

  1. Consider whether you need a fireproof safe for storing documents or storing computer devices. What many don't realize is that if you plan on storing things such as CDs, DVDs or computer hard drives in your security safe, you need a specialized model. All fireproof safes will work well for storing important documents, such as receipts and tax information, but only specialized safes will protect your important computer equipment during a fire.
  2. Look at the fire rating for each safe you are considering. This rating specifically correlates to the effectiveness of the product. For example, if you're buying a safe to store computer equipment, you need one with at least a rating of 125. This means that the temperature inside of the safe will never get above 125 degrees.

  3. Consider the area in which you are putting your safe. Fireproof safes can be quite heavy depending on the size, so you want to make sure you're putting it in a place where the floor won't collapse under the weight. Also consider that in the event of a fire, you don't want the safe in a place where things could collapse on it to the point where it becomes impossible to get to after the fire has been put out.

  4. Determine your price range. You could spend $150 on a cheap fireproof safe or easily spend more than $1,000 on a more expensive model. Buying a cheap fireproof safe may save money, but remember that you'll be storing important documents and equipment that are irreplaceable. Ask yourself if saving money on the safe is worth potentially losing your important paperwork in the event of a fire.


Polymer Insulators Pros and Cons

image from www.compaqinternational.com

Ceramic and glass insulators have long been the materials of choice for high-voltage insulators and lightning arresters, offering good resistance to electrical stress and outdoor exposure without significant deterioration. However, they do have disadvantages such as poor hydrophobicity and low performance under contaminated environmental conditions, low seismic performance, are prone to punctures, suffer from cement growth, pin erosion, susceptible to vandalism, relative higher installations costs.

Polymer insulators were first developed by GE in 1959 and since then many manufacturers have been trying to improve their characteristics and performances.

NCIs or composite insulators designs offer lighter weight, less breakage,improved seismic performance, high hydrophobicity and withstanding contaminated condition and more flexibility in design than ceramic insulators. These features often translate into lower installation cost, greater durability and more aesthetically pleasing line design. Yet, along these benefits problems were detected such as: bonding failures leading to flashover, hardware separation of the fiberglass core leading to line drops, chalking, crazing and shed's splitting allowing humid penetration causing electrical failure.

Polymer insulators cons are their fast aging` susceptibility to UV radiation (sun & corona); handling and storage concerns and lower withstanding to mechanical loads. Often it is being stated that the lack in experience in the HV market (less than 3 decades of use) makes trending analysis of polymer insulators hard to get.

NCI's general structure:Where the end-fittings are made of metal, the core rod is made of FRP - Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic, with an outer housing made from either silicone rubber, EPDM or EPR

One of the major and most important characteristics of Silicon is hydrophobicity i.e. the capability to form beads of water allowing a resistance to wetting. When contamination build-up is exposed to moisture, an electrolytic film can develop, leading to excessive leakage current, dry band arcing and eventually to flashover. such as wetting corona activity resulting from non-uniform wetting and high electrical field mainly on the energized and ground end-fittings.

Grading rings are being introduced lately to insulators of lower voltages. The role of corona rings is to lower the e-field stress and shift it away from the end fitting. Grading rings can prevent corona and it's derives: radio interferences, audio noise, and formation of nitric acid and ozone. (read more...).

Typical failures of polymeric insulators are brittle fractures (read more...), mechanical and electrical rod failures as flashunder, end-fitting detachments, flashover and others, all of which can be detected by a UV camera such as DayCor®

Ofil's DayCor® cameras extend the advantages of NCI insulators and diminish their disadvantages because they can alert at the early stages of partial discharges before theses turn into full discharge, arcing flashover and deterioration of the insulation material. 


Delta Arrestor Protects You From High Voltage Surge

image from deltasurgeprotectors.com

A lightning arrestor (delta arrestor) helps to provide immediate and reliable protection against the high voltage surge (such as that of a lightning strike) on your building or power lines. These units last for a lifetime, except in the extreme cases of rare excess surges. This particular type of surge is particularly devastating to electrical components, almost always rendering them useless. In addition, if you are not protected against high voltage surges, an electrical fire can easily be started within moments as a result of high current levels rushing through building wires.

 

Your breaker box is incapable of providing protection against this “lightning fast” surge of electricity. By the time your breaker has switched off, the surge has literally already done its damage. Note that although a lightning arrestor helps to prevent high voltage spikes from infiltrating your circuits, it does not protect against the common smaller surges.


How to Buy a Fireproof Safe

image from www.safeman.org.uk

  1. Consider whether you need a fireproof safe for storing documents or storing computer devices. What many don't realize is that if you plan on storing things such as CDs, DVDs or computer hard drives in your security safe, you need a specialized model. All fireproof safes will work well for storing important documents, such as receipts and tax information, but only specialized safes will protect your important computer equipment during a fire.
  2. Look at the fire rating for each safe you are considering. This rating specifically correlates to the effectiveness of the product. For example, if you're buying a safe to store computer equipment, you need one with at least a rating of 125. This means that the temperature inside of the safe will never get above 125 degrees.

  3. Consider the area in which you are putting your safe. Fireproof safes can be quite heavy depending on the size, so you want to make sure you're putting it in a place where the floor won't collapse under the weight. Also consider that in the event of a fire, you don't want the safe in a place where things could collapse on it to the point where it becomes impossible to get to after the fire has been put out.

  4. Determine your price range. You could spend $150 on a cheap fireproof safe or easily spend more than $1,000 on a more expensive model. Buying a cheap fireproof safe may save money, but remember that you'll be storing important documents and equipment that are irreplaceable. Ask yourself if saving money on the safe is worth potentially losing your important paperwork in the event of a fire.